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Elvis Saravia

Evolving the learning experience

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Today my wife brought up an interesting point about the work-life balance concept. She believes it is utter BS. “It’s a horrible idea we are being fed by rich tycoons and click-bait enthusiasts,” she adds. Why should we believe on the radical idea that by balancing life and work we are to receive greatness and countless achievements in return? Kind of silly, right? Still not convinced yet? Allow me to explain.


First, her remarks made me stumble a little bit since I have been contemplating the work-life balance principle as a potential lifestyle. Especially since I believe it could bring happiness to our little family. Apparently, not all diamonds are as valuable as they seem. This one is no different.


My wife began to strengthen her point as the back-and-forth continued through brunch. She explains that “such concept is exactly what drives people to failure in our society.” We are made to believe that everything will turn out exactly as we want if we just know how to find the perfect equilibrium between work and life. “Perfect equilibrium” is something worth talking about a little further. “We seamlessly believe such b-rule (bullshit rule) even when we recognize that someone else might be eating our lunch in front of our face. That is madness!” she continues. This is exactly what favors the well-established since now we are disabled with nonsense; mentally impaired with garbage – none of which favors the less-fortunate. How can we challenge the status quo with our hands tied behind our back and, our eyes covered with a pitch black strap? We are in trouble. In fact, we are in deep trouble. Not all hope is lost, however.


Frankly, the more examples she kept presenting to me the more perplexed I became. Work-life balance meant something different for me: a promised land; a promised dream; and an independent life filled with plenty of spectacular moments. Reality check looks like the face of a cold-blooded ogre. But it allows you to realize that nothing in life comes easy. That is a rule found even in the testaments of the Bible. To receive and achieve, one must cultivate the land and love our family. One must not try to seek a shortcut or a permanent formula for success. Success comes with sweat and vision. Success doesn’t manifest itself through reliance on false theories or misconceptions.


Overall, we must work like our lives depend on it (cause it does) and cease all efforts on trying to hack the system. I believe we spend too much time thinking of strategies that only puts us at a disadvantage. For instance, growth hacking is doing everything and anything to stay relevant and capture attention without limitation. What some people don’t expect is the brutal recoil of trolls that accompanies popularity – that is another matter for a later post. Let us open our eyes and write our own rules for how we plan to succeed. Let us stop relying on rules that only apply to people with certain advantages. Our new rules should speak a million words of the true gladiators we are. Battles are not won using existent and outdated strategies. They are won with creativity, self-worth, and originality.


Your work and life deserve more seriousness – too important to be submitted to experimental bogusness. No one is claiming it is easy out there, but we should make it our priority to stand up for our ideas and beliefs for they are all we have left. Our precious time deserves to be treated right and not to be manipulated by “too good to be true” principles of life. Let us be serious and work towards an objective that is worth pursuing. Let’s not fall victims to the vines or bubbles that are cynically and strategically perpetrated by evil conglomerates. They seem to know it all and manipulate our lives as they please, and in the most absurd ways. Today I am taking a stand. I create my own rules and progress with my life and work and treat them with dignity instead of submitting them to nonsensical ideologies. I rest my case. Work-Life balance is too good to be true and it doesn’t apply to everyone.